Counties We Serve

Dallas | Tarrant | Collin

Office Hours

We write bail bonds 24/7

Dallas: (214) 749-5600

Irving: (972) 785-1000

McKinney: (972) 542-5155

Plano: (972) 422-1544

Fort Worth: (817) 877-5555

Arlington: (817) 801-1230

Police officers are specially trained to spot the signs of drunk driving. The sheer number of people in Dallas, TX, who require DUI bail bonds each year is a testament to the proficiency of police officers in spotting drunk drivers. But well before you do make arrangements for a bail bond for DUI charges, you’ll need to know how to behave once you’ve been pulled over. Of course, it’s always preferable to simply never drink and drive, never put others on the roads at risk, and never have the need to make arrangements for a bail bond for DUI charges.

Avoid Behaving Suspiciously

If you did have a few drinks while out on the town, you can help yourself by not making the police officer feel uneasy or threatened. Pull over as soon as it is safe to do so, turn on the interior lights in your car, and shut off the ignition. Keep your hands on your steering wheel. Do not reach for your license or registration, or for anything else. If the officer sees you moving around in the car, he or she will automatically assume that you’re reaching for a weapon or hiding contraband.

Limit Your Answers

The police officer will ask you a number of questions about how many drinks you’ve had, where you’re going, and where you’re coming from. You should only provide basic identifying information, such as your full name. Do not answer any leading questions, even if they seem to be relatively harmless. Simply say, “I respectfully decline to answer that, officer.” The officer might threaten to throw you in jail if you refuse to answer, but you can rest assured that you will not be jailed simply because you exercised your right to remain silent.

Decline to Do Field Sobriety Tests

The only reason a police officer will ask you to do a field sobriety test is if he or she is already planning to take you into custody. Field sobriety tests are never in your best interests; they only add to the evidence against you. You have the legal right to decline these tests.

Consent to Chemical Tests at the Station

Before you can arrange a DUI bail bond, you’ll be asked to take a chemical test at the precinct. Lawyers generally recommend consenting to this test, since you’ll face automatic penalties if you refuse.