Counties We Serve

Dallas | Tarrant | Collin

Office Hours

We write bail bonds 24/7

Dallas: (214) 749-5600

Irving: (972) 785-1000

McKinney: (972) 542-5155

Plano: (972) 422-1544

Fort Worth: (817) 877-5555

Arlington: (817) 801-1230

Criminal offenses are classified according to their nature and severity. Violations are the least severe and felonies are the most severe. Misdemeanors fall into the middle of this range. Although misdemeanors are not as severe as felonies, they can still result in time behind bars. After you’ve been arrested and taken into custody, a judge may decide to set bail, which means you can be released on a misdemeanor bail bond. Although the amount of bail for a misdemeanor is typically less than it would be for a felony, you’ll still likely need the assistance of a bondsman to arrange a misdemeanor bail bond in Dallas, TX.

Class A Misdemeanors

Under the Texas Penal Code, Class A misdemeanors are the most serious type of this general classification. A conviction of a Class A misdemeanor is punishable by up to one year in jail or a fine of up to $4,000, or both of these penalties. One example of a Class A misdemeanor is assault with bodily injury. A person would also need a misdemeanor bail bond for committing a second DWI offense, violating a protection order, or resisting arrest.

Class B Misdemeanors

If you are convicted of a Class B misdemeanor in Texas, the judge may sentence you to no more than 180 days in jail or a fine of up to $2,000. Alternatively, you may be ordered to pay a fine and serve time behind bars. One example of a Class B misdemeanor is a first DWI offense. A defendant might also need a misdemeanor bail bond after being charged with criminal trespass, harassment, vandalism, or making a false report to a police officer.

Class C Misdemeanors

As the least severe category of misdemeanors under Texas criminal law, a conviction of a Class C misdemeanor is not punishable by jail time. Of course, defendants will still be arrested and may require misdemeanor bail bonds. Instead of jail time, individuals convicted of a Class C misdemeanor could be ordered to pay up to $500 in fines. It is at the discretion of the judge whether to order community service in addition to the fine or in lieu of it.